The smoking process

Posted in: History- Feb 22, 2011 7 Comments

I just pulled beef shortribs, a cured beef brisket, bacon and a couple of chickens off the smoker. To me it reminds me of the coming Spring to Charlottesville and central Virginia.  The beef is local, and the chickens came from Timbercreek Organics.  In a day these wonderful products will be on our menu.

Smoking is the process of flavoring, cooking, or preserving food by exposing it to the smoke from burning or smoldering plant materials, most often wood. Meats and fish are the most common smoked foods, though cheeses, vegetables, and ingredients used to make beverages such as whisky, Rauchbier and lapsang souchong tea are also smoked.

In Europe, alder is the traditional smoking wood, but oak is more often used now, and beech to a lesser extent. In North America, hickory, mesquite, oak, pecan, alder, maple, and fruit-tree woods, such as apple, cherry and plum, are commonly used for smoking. Other fuels besides wood can also be employed, sometimes with the addition of flavoring ingredients. Chinese tea-smoking uses a mixture of uncooked rice, sugar, and tea, heated at the base of a wok. Some North American ham and bacon makers smoke their products over burning corncobs. Peat is burned to dry and smoke the barley malt used to make whisky and some beers. In New Zealand, sawdust from the native manuka (tea tree) is commonly used for hot smoking fish. In Iceland, dried sheep dung is used to cold smoke fish, lamb, mutton and whale, resulting in a unique and rather strongly smoked flavor.

Historically, farms in the western world included a small building termed the smokehouse, where meats could be smoked and stored. This was generally well-separated from other buildings both because of the fire danger and because of the smoke emanations.

Smoke is an antimicrobial and antioxidant, but smoke alone is insufficient for preserving food in practice, unless combined with another preservation method. The main problem is the smoke compounds adhere only to the outer surfaces of the food; smoke does not actually penetrate far into meat or fish. In modern times, almost all smoking is carried out for its flavor. Artificial smoke flavoring can be purchased as a liquid to mimic the flavor of smoking, but not its preservative qualities (see also liquid smoke).

In the past, smoking was a useful preservation tool, in combination with other techniques, most commonly salt-curing or drying. In some cases, particularly in climates without much hot sunshine, smoking was simply an unavoidable side effect of drying over a fire. For some long-smoked foods, the smoking time also served to dry the food. Drying, curing, or other techniques can render the interior of foods inhospitable to bacterial life, while the smoking gives the vulnerable exterior surfaces an extra layer of protection. For oily fish smoking is especially useful, as its antioxidant properties delay surface fat rancidification. (Interior fat is not as exposed to oxygen, which is what causes rancidity.) Some heavily-salted, long-smoked fish can keep without refrigeration for weeks or months. Such heavily-preserved foods usually require a treatment such as boiling in fresh water to make them palatable before eating.

7 Responses to “The smoking process”

  1. Reply Name says:

    Forfoden er meget fleksibel (og stadig polstret) takket være de dybt udskårne flex riller. Nikes BRS-1000 gummi giver et godt greb selv over våd beton, og det er yderst holdbar: Jeg har logget måde mere end 500 km på mine Triax 13s og gummi er for det meste alt stadig er der, som du kan se fra den ene af billederne!

  2. Reply cancer hypertherie says:

    hello!,I like your writing so so much! share we be in contact more approximately your article on AOL? I require an expert on this space to unravel my problem. May be that is you! Taking a look forward to look you.

  3. Reply German Bankemper says:

    What’s Taking place i’m new to this, I stumbled upon this I’ve found It positively helpful and it has helped me out loads. I hope to contribute & assist different users like its helped me. Good job.

  4. Reply http://youtube.com says:

    Excellent post. Keep posting such kind of
    information on your site. Im really impressed by it.

    Hi there, You’ve done an excellent job.

    I will certainly digg it and in my view suggest to my friends.
    I am confident they will be benefited from this web site.

  5. Reply Marcos says:

    Great article.

Leave a Reply